Journal search

For important background information, see:

Tip: For many additional use cases relating to author searches see the Publish or Perish Tutorial.

How to perform an Journal search

To perform a basic Journal search:

  1. Enter the journal's name in the Publication/journal field;
  2. Click Lookup or press the Enter key.

The program will now contact the data source in question to obtain the citations, process the list, and calculate the Citation metrics, which are then displayed in the Results list. The full list of results is also available for inspection or modifications and can be exported in a variety of formats.

Journal search syntax across databases

Every data source has its own unique syntax that – oftentimes – is not fully documented. Below you will find the most important tips and problems, but to get the best out of the different data sources you need to be prepared to experiment with different search strategies. If you find that some things are not working as you expect, please share your findings by sending me an email, so that, collectively, we can improve these instructions.

Please note: The search syntax below refers to what works best when you search the data source through Publish or Perish. This is not always identical to the most effective search syntax in the web interfaces of the respective databases as these might be structured differently.

Data source Preferred search syntax Most common problems
Crossref

1. ISSN

2. Full journal title

==> sort by rank, uncheck all results (right-click Uncheck All or Ctrl+U), find last consecutive relevant result, select all results before that and check these results (right-click Check Selection or Num +)

1. None, CrossRef provides excellent results for ISSN searches

2. CrossRef implements an OR search (e.g. Management OR International OR Review) and thus reports many irrelevant results.

3. Cannot search for multiple journals
Google Scholar (GS)

1. Full journal title in quotes (e.g. “Management International Review”).

2. As #1, but add ISSN, especially useful for journals with a common name such as e.g. “Journal of Management” for which a search will report many partial namesakes.

3. Can search for multiple journals by including OR between quoted journal titles.

1. For common journal titles may report many irrelevant results. Can also search for partial title, but this will report even more irrelevant results.

2. A search by ISSN alone isn’t usually very effective as GS matches ISSN everywhere in the text and thus reports many irrelevant results.

3. Size of search field limited to approximately 100 characters, typically only two journals can be searched for at the same time.
Google Scholar Profile (GSP) N/A only author searches N/A only author searches
Microsoft Academic (MA)

1. Full journal title only

2. Can search for multiple journals by including OR between journal titles

1. MA provides excellent results, even for journals with common names, but only if you include the full and exact journal title.

However, MA does seem to “interpret” abbreviations (e.g. JASIST) and separators like &.
Scopus

1. Full journal title

2. ISSN

3. Can search for multiple journals in ISSN field by including OR between ISSNs

1a. Good results, but does not allow single-year searches (e.g. 2015-2015).

1b. For common journal titles can give many irrelevant results. Can also search for partial title, but this will give even more irrelevant results.

2. None. Scopus provides excellent results for ISSN searches, but does not allow single-year searches (e.g. 2015-2015).
Web of Science

1. Full journal title

2. ISSN

3. Can search for partial journal titles with wildcards (e.g. Journal of International Ma* will report Journal of International Management and Journal of International Marketing)

4. Can search for multiple journals in both publication/journal field and ISSN field by including OR between search terms. 

1. WoS provides excellent results, even for journals with common names, but only if you include the full and exact journal title.

2. None. WoS provides excellent results for ISSN searches.