LIS-Bibliometrics 10th anniversary event: The Future of Research Evaluation

LIS-Bibliometrics was set up in 2010, with a particular focus on supporting LIS (Library and Information Science) professionals with the increasing volume of bibliometric queries, and training they were called upon to deliver. Increasingly, members are joining from other settings, such as Research and Planning Offices, as well as researchers in bibliometric science. The group is running a blog The Bibliomagician and a mailing list, which you can access here.
The group also holds a yearly 1-day workshop at which I have presented in the past. This year the LIS-Bibliometrics celebrated its 10th year anniversary with a workshop in Leeds. It included live-streamed sessions, thanks to the support of the Institution of Engineering and Technology. The videos are reproduced below.

Opening and closing

Three keynotes

Dr Steven Hill is Director of Research at Research England, leading its research assessment and policy work. He is chair of the steering group for the 2021 Research Excellence Framework (REF).

Dr Gemma Derrick is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Educational Research at Lancaster University, where her research concentrates on science and innovation policy and its impacts. She specialises in evaluation systems in academia and is a leading member of the COMbINE (Complementary Methods in Evaluation Research) network.

Prof James Wilsdon is Digital Science Professor of Research Policy in the University of Sheffield’s Department of Politics and Director of the Research on Research Institute. He chaired the independent review of the role of metrics in the management of the research system, publishing The Metric Tide in July 2015.

Break-out on competencies & Lightning talks

Lightning talks are five minute presentations on how a particular university is dealing with issues such as national research evaluation exercises (e.g. REF), implementing responsible metrics principles/declarations, responsible metrics generally, assessing societal impact and changing research evaluation cultures.

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